The Snowfields.

I recently began reading a new book, the Wild Boy. Written by the Italian author Paolo Cognetti the book has been released in several different countries and languages. My copy is in French (Le garçon sauvage) and it’s the first ‘Roman Français‘ (French translation of novel) I have tested myself with. I’m fairly struggling to say the least. My knowledge of French vocabulary is not at an extremely high level. Nevertheless I’m enjoying it, and enjoying learning French in general. It’s opening up my world in very significant ways and has given me a desire to learn a little bit of others too. Whenever I’m using Duolingo (a fantastic language learning website) I find myself having a bash at ‘plusiers langues‘. So far I’ve done French, Spanish, German, Italian, Irish and Russian. But don’t expect me to be publishing multilingual posts anytime soon. I had considered writing more in French as it’s my strongest second language. For now I aim to continue like so and share some international works in the meantime.

 

le garcon sauvage

 

”Une expérience de la solitude en montagne pour retrouver l’écriture.”

See if you can work that one out for yourselves….

My desire to share some work from this novel has been slightly muddled by the fact that I am an English speaker reading an Italian novel translated into French.. My head is fried with the multilingualism at the moment. I don’t think anyone realises how tiring it can be just until they’ve tried it. My cognitive skills have been retrained to think and develop thoughts in an entirely new structure. And with these new structures often comes new attitudes to general life because languages are formed by different human perceptions. All in all it’s fascinating to say the least…

Before Cognetti begins his novel he shares some work by an Italian poet, Antonia Pozzi. Despite committing suicide at a very young age she managed to produce hundreds of poems. I love the French translation and I’m very happy to share that along with my own attempt to translate into English.

”J’ai séjourné dans les hauteurs
au-delà des sapins –
cheminé par monts et vaux
lumineux –
Traversé des lacs morts – et les ondes prisonnières
m’ont chuchoté
un secret –
longé des rives blanches, appelant
par leur nom les gentianes
assoupies –
J’ai rêvé dans la neige d’une immense
ville de fleurs
ensevelie –
J’ai écumé les monts
hérissée comme une fleur –
regardant les rochers,
les hautes parois
dans les mers du vent –
et, chantant à mi-voix, je me souvenais
d’un ancien été
où les rhododendrons amers
prenaient feu dans mon sang.”

La Route du Mourir, Névés. Traduction de Patrick Remaux.

”I stayed in the heights
Beyond the firs –
Surrounded by mountains and valleys
luminous –
Crossing the dead lakes – and the captive waves
they whispered to me
a secret –
Along the white banks, called
by their name the Gentians
drowsy –
I dreamed in the snow of a vast
city of flowers
buried –
I scoured the mountains
Standing tall like a flower –
Watching the rocks,
the high walls
in the seas of wind –
and, singing in a hushed tone, I remembered
a bygone summer
where the bitter rhodonderons
caught fire in my blood”

Road to Death, The Snowfields. Translation, Aidan Meehan.

antonia pozzi  Antonia Pozzi.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Hidden Life of Trees.

“A tree’s most important means of staying connected to other trees is a “wood wide web” of soil fungi that connects vegetation in an intimate network that allows the sharing of an enormous amount of information and goods.” 

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“There are more life forms in a handful of forest soil than there are people on the planet. A mere teaspoonful contains many miles of fungal filaments. All these work the soil, transform it, and make it so valuable for the trees.” 

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“When you know that trees experience pain and have memories and that tree parents live together with their children, then you can no longer just chop them down and disrupt their lives with larger machines.” 

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“If we want to use forests as a weapon in the fight against climate change, then we must allow them to grow old, which is exactly what large conservation groups are asking us to do.”

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My hope is that the wolves’ stewardship of natural processes in Yellowstone will help people appreciate the complex ways that trees interact with their environment, how our interactions with forests affect their success, and the role forests play in making our world the kind of place where we want to live. Apart from that, forests hide wonders that we are only just beginning to explore. I invite you to enter my world.

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All quotes taken from ‘The Hidden Life of Trees‘ by Peter Wohlleben. Just this week I plunged myself into a new career path. I’ve begun an apprenticeship in landscaping and green space management. l’Aménagement des Espaces Verts.. Paysagers.

It’s a whole new world to me. A path in my life which opened after reading this book. It details a fascinating insight into the lives and communication systems of the forest and trees. I came across it at a time not long after a very upsetting episode where my health took a hit. And the combination of moving to an area of the world with an abundance of ecological wealth and the ‘luck’ to find this book on a spontaneous visit to the Argyle Street Waterstones in Glasgow City Centre, has given me a certain belief that this may just have been meant for me. It’s no surprise to me that the quality of my life has vastly improved since redirecting my focus down this road. And it gives me great motivation to work harder to succeed in these challenges set out for me.

I took these pictures in two separate places. The 2nd, 4th and 5th at the Old Kilpatrick Hills, Scotland. And the 1st and 3rd at the Gorges du Versoud, France.